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Malevolence

Desktop CPU Thread

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cncnzintelcoreis.png

 

 

Intel Second Generation Core i_ Series

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Intel Core i7 26xx series LGA 1155

  • i7-2600S Clock Speed: 2.80GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.80GHz 32nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-2600K Clock Speed: 3.40GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.80GHz 32nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-2600 Clock Speed: 2.80GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.80GHz 32nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor

 

Intel Core i5 2xxx series LGA 1155

  • i5-2500T Clock Speed: 2.30GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.30GHz 32nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-2500S Clock Speed: 2.70GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.70GHz 32nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-2500K Clock Speed: 3.30GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.70GHz 32nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-2500 Clock Speed: 3.30GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.70GHz 32nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-2400S Clock Speed: 2.50GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.30GHz 32nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-2400 Clock Speed: 3.10GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.40GHz 32nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-2390T Clock Speed: 2.70GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.50GHz 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-2300 Clock Speed: 2.80GHz; Max Turbo Freq: 3.10GHz 32nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor

 

Intel Core i3 21xx series LGA 1155

  • i3-2120 Clock Speed: 3.30GHz 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i3-2100T Clock Speed: 2.50GHz 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i3-2100 Clock Speed: 3.10GHz 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor

 

 

Intel First Generation Core i_ Series

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  • Intel Core i7 9xx series LGA 1366
  • Intel Core i5 6xx series, Intel Core i5 7xx series, Intel Core i7 8xx series LGA 1156
  • Intel Core i3 5xx series LGA 1156

 

Intel Core i7 9xx series LGA 1366 a.k.a. Quad-Core Desktop processors (Lynnfield 45nm) / Six-Core Desktop processor (Gulftown 32nm)

Click Here To find Out More on Core i7 9xx series.

Click Here To find Out More on Core i7 980X processor.

  • i7-990X Extreme Edition 3.46Ghz SLBVZ (B1) 32nm 6-cores, 12-threads Processor
  • i7-980X Extreme Edition 3.33Ghz SLBUZ (B1) 32nm 6-cores, 12-threads Processor
  • i7-975 Extreme Edition 3.33Ghz SLBEQ (D0) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-965 Extreme Edition 3.20Ghz SLBCJ (C0) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-970 3.20Ghz SLBVF (B1) 32nm 6-cores, 12-threads Processor
  • i7-960 3.20Ghz SLBEU (D0) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-950 3.06Ghz SLBEN (D0) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-940 2.93Ghz SLBCK (C0) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-930 2.80Ghz SLBKP (D0) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-920 2.66Ghz SLBEJ (D0) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor

Intel Core i7 8xx series LGA 1156 a.k.a. Quad-Core Desktop processors (Lynnfield 45nm)

Click Here To find Out More.

  • i7-880 3.06Ghz SLBPS (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-875K 2.93Ghz SLBS2 (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-870 2.93Ghz SLBJG (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-860 2.80Ghz SLBJJ (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-870S 2.66Ghz SLBQ7 (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor
  • i7-860S 2.53Ghz SLBLG (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 8-threads Processor

Intel Core i5 7xx series LGA 1156 a.k.a. Quad-Core Desktop processors (Lynnfield 45nm)

Click Here To find Out More.

  • i5-760 2.80Ghz SLBRP (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-750 2.66Ghz SLBLC (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-750S 2.40Ghz SLBLH (B1) 45nm 4-cores, 4-threads Processor

Intel Core i5 6xx series LGA 1156 a.k.a. Dual-Core Desktop processors (Clarkdale 32nm) with integrated Graphics Processor (IGP) (45nm)

Click Here To find Out More.

  • i5-680 3.60Ghz SLBTM (K0) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-670 3.46Ghz SLBLT (C2) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-661 3.33Ghz SLBNE (C2) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-660 3.33Ghz SLBLV (C2) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-655K 3.20Ghz SLBXL (K0) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i5-650 3.20Ghz SLBLK (C2) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor

Intel Core i3 5xx series LGA 1156 a.k.a. Dual-Core Desktop processors (Clarkdale 32nm) with integrated Graphics Processor (IGP) (45nm)

Click Here To find Out More.

  • i3-550 3.20Ghz SLBUD (K0) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i3-540 3.06Ghz SLBMQ (C2) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor
  • i3-530 2.93Ghz SLBLR (C2) 32nm 2-cores, 4-threads Processor

 

 

What you need to know:

  • Core i7 > Core i5 > Core i3
  • Intel has 3 different sockets for various Core i_ processors. mainstream LGA 1156, enthusiast LGA 1366, and the new 2nd Generation LGA 1155. When purchasing motherboard and processor, please double check that both the chipset and the processor are compatible.
  • Core i7's LGA 1366 processor goes with X58 motherboards.
  • All LGA 1156 processors fit into P55, H55 & H57 motherboards.
  • H55 and H57 motherboards work best with Core i3 processors as it utilizes the IGP.
  • All LGA 1155 processors fit into P67 & H67 motherboards.
  • Sandy Bridge architecture is replacing the older P55 LGA 1156 lineups.
  • Sandy Bridge processors are using the new LGA 1155 socket.
  • Enthusiasts have to wait patiently for the new upcoming LGA 2011, which will replace the current X58 LGA 1366 lineups.

Any queries in regards to the Core i_ series you may post them here. Enjoy! :)

Edited by Malevolence
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Yes, I read that not too long ago, as well. Shame they couldn't find a middle ground between socket sizes before Core i7 even had its name so they could share sockets. I do like where they're going in the mainstream segment with all that, though.

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Shame they couldn't find a middle ground between socket sizes before Core i7 even had its name so they could share sockets.

 

They did that on purpose, so if you want a new chip you are forced to get that particular mobo and possibly (if you don't have recycled DDR3 rams), then you have to get the new rams too.

 

I read that article and I was kinda surprised how steep the prices of the i5 processors are. I was expecting the difference of i5/i7 prices would be quite big, I was wrong.

 

I am shock to hear that the lowest 2.66Ghz model will not have HT, which is kinda weird.

 

Overall, this news was kinda disappointing to me.

 

On another note, this Core i5 may be delayed till October. :(

 

 

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I've taken the time to do a cleanup on this thread. I believe this thread is essential as there will be lots of confusion going on for the consumers due to its complicated branding, and some cases, rehashing.

 

Any queries in regards to the Core i series you may post them here. Enjoy! :)

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Looks like you did a nice job covering everything. Can't say the same for Intel, though, they should stick to one number range per socket.

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very nice presentation and very clear

 

thank you for the update Mal,

 

my conclusions are that after all those years Core2Duo and Core2Quad and LGA 775 Sockets is the Clear winner here!

now that they will even support DDR3 nothing can stop them because they will be even chipper in the future too.

 

this "turbo" bs intel is bring now back from the 80s and MMX is just stupid! who is gona have a cpu NOT working in full speed all the time!?

what kind of crap is that!?

 

the icore line and sockets and turbo bs will be there doom again as it happened before and AMD's athlon took a huge share.

 

Keep it simple Intel dont confuse the customers advanced or not with this BS. if you cant make new clean fast cheaps don't play around with the names, to avoid comparisons.

i smell CPU defeat in the future and its coming from AMD like a hammer..... ;-) (at least i hope so for the sake of competition and low prices)

Edited by Johnnyxp64
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Thank you for your positive feedback. As such I'll continue to maintain and update this thread regularly if required.

 

I am very surprise when I heard that the Core 2 lines are given a longer lifespan on the shelves, especially with talks about updating their chipsets with newer DDR3 support and stuff. I guess it'll probably be one of the processors with the longest lifespan so far.

 

I'm not sure how AMD is going to catch up with Intel, especially given that AMD decided to go manufacturing various types of processors designed to meet the lowest budget to the mid budget consumers. I'm hoping AMD could come back with something mean to match the Core i7 and the Gulftown series, and when the day comes we'll benefit even more by seeing more price slashes between these two rivals.

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I have what I think is a simple question, what is this whole turbo thing?

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I have what I think is a simple question, what is this whole turbo thing?

 

Do you mean Intel® Turbo Boost Technology?

 

Turbo Boost, or commonly known as Turbo Mode, is a new interesting performance feature found in newer CPUs such as the recent Bloomfield Core i7 and the Upcoming Lynnfield Core i5/i7 chips.

 

Basically this feature allows all active cores to intelligently clock themselves up in steps of 133.33MHz above the design clock rate as long as the CPU's predetermined thermal and electrical requirements are still met.

 

For a clearer video presentation, visit http://www.intel.com/technology/turboboost/ and click on the "View the Intel Turbo Boost Technology demo" link.

 

Here's some examples:

 

Stock Speed example:

 

Guy A has a Core i7 920 D0 chip that goes on stock 2.67Ghz, 20X multiplier and 133.33Mhz base clock. With Turbo Boost Mode enabled, the multiplier increases by 1, i.e. 21X. The processor will go at 2.8Ghz on stock with TB enabled.

 

Overclocking Speed example:

 

Turbo Boost is very useful especially for enthusiasts who keeps talking about figures and stuff. We always hear enthusiasts mentioning that Core i7 920 D0 chips can be overclocked to 4.2Ghz. It can be done by overclocking base clock to 200.00Mhz, while multiplier remains unchanged at 20X. With the help of TB, an increase of multiplier by 1 making it 21X, overall 21X 200Mhz = 4200Mhz = 4.2Ghz theoretically. (Not discussing on voltage overclock and temperatures and stuff)

 

Hope that answers your question. :)

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for some reviews on the new CPUs check this out:

 

http://www.guru3d.com/article/core-i5-750-...or-review-test/

 

huge p.s

i still think the turbo mode is only confusing and actualyl pointless way to keep the tmps and power consum low!

you buy for eg a3.4ghz cpu that runs at 2.66ghz and when need it it speeds up (depending from the core usage) from 3.2gh to 3.4 etc......duh. just make then work all the time in 3.4.-

now they are just like a damn laptop in Batary EIST mode... nothing so special, beause we dont have the matirials yet to build Fast CPU with not TMP issues.

 

i cant wait for the En-Light CPU technology to come out.(i dont remember the actuall name yet, just that 4 years ago this CPU was like a Hard Disk in size and had fiber optics like path-ways to work in its core non the usual metalic electricity freadly matirials we use now, so it needed no FANS and was runing at 10GHZ! NASA had them in a Super Computer for testing for about 4 years, yes from 2000-2001 and the company (i think is an Israil one) that builded them now tries to make them smaller like our days CPU and give it to the public after 10-15 years.

 

intel's turbo mode.... yea its working ok i just personally dont like the idea that the machine decides when i need the full power! thats crappy! no matter how smart it is it cant predict what i am going to do next, like having a car with 300HP and it runs in 100HP but if you put your foot down to overtake it will start after 1,something seconds to give you all 300HP....yeah but untill you start the overtake the car has no idea what you wish to do so this delay even sort can be prove fatal!

 

its Honda's original v-tech Idea that Intel is actually copies here :P lol

 

imageviewturbo.jpeg

Edited by Johnnyxp64
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Thanks for keeping this updated Malevolence; it's nice to have an easy reference close at hand for those of us not keeping up as much as you are :)

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intelcorei7980xslide01.jpg

 

26a.jpg

 

Previously planned for a Q2 release, Intel's Gulftown, aka the Core i7 980X has been pulled into Q1 and is now set to debut in March 2010 (maybe at CeBIT 2010), before AMD's Thuban. The Core i7 980X is manufactured on 32nm technology, comes in an LGA 1366 package, has six cores and twelve threads, 12MB of L3 cache, a 130W TDP, 6.4 GT/s QPI, and will cost about $999.

 

The upcoming hexa-core will work on current X58 motherboards granted there will be a BIOS update provided. Asus for example already has eight Gulftown-ready boards.

 

http://www.tcmagazine.com/comments.php?sho...493&catid=2

 

Apparently the new 6 core processor is classified under Core i7 line, yea now things gets more messy.

Edited by Malevolence
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Intel Unveils Core i5 6xx, 6x1 Series Dual-Core Processors

 

Intel today gave a go ahead for the media to publish reviews of its brand new dual-core processors under the Core i5 6xx and Core i5 6x1 series. The processors are based on the new "Clarkdale" processor die, and make use of the company's 32 nm next generation HKMG manufacturing process. Unlike conventional processor packages based on the Nehalem/Westmere architecture, the new processors move the northbridge component of the system onto the processor package, only that it is based on a separate 45 nm die within the package. The 32 nm processor die houses two processor cores along with up to 4 MB of L3 cache, while it is wired to a larger iGPU die which houses the dual-channel DDR3 memory controller, a graphics core, PCI-Express root complex, along with other components traditionally found on northbridge chips.

 

The first three models in the new Core i5 series are the 3.20 GHz Core i5 650, 3.33 GHz Core i5 660 and 661 (latter has a faster iGPU), and 3.46 GHz Core i5 670. These processors have the LGA-1156 package and are compatible with existing P55 Express chipset (albeit without the iGPU feature), along with the company's new H55 Express and H57 Express chipsets that support the Flexible Display Interface that provides connectivity to the processors' iGPUs. The new processors feature HyperThreading Technology, with which it provides the operating system with four logical CPUs (threads) to deal with, TurboBoost technology which powers down a core and overclocks the other when the task load is low. Pricing and availability will surface when the processors are formally announced, a little later this month. Meanwhile, motherboard manufacturers are ready with boatloads of new motherboard models based on Intel's two new chipsets.

 

15aiq.jpg15ba.jpg15cq.png

 

 

http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?t=111927

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I'm more interested in Core i3 than anything at the moment. I'm gonna pump my current build to that.

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No problems, I'm just browsing atm. :)

 

Things are awfully expensive these days. :( Well kinda.

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Sandy Bridge is ready to take over next-generation Nehalem microarchitecture, will be listed in the first quarter of 2011, using Socket 1155 pin, according to unnamed sources that the next generation of Sandy Bridge processor IIntel named, will be Core Ix-2x00 for the nomenclature, the number of cores and L3 cache in accordance with different named Core I3-2x00, Core I5-2x00, Core I7-2x00

 

Chart below is for reference only

357143f6e5ad6ed0e20e6d60127353e9.png

 

 

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=e.../cms/tid-46719/

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Intel's Q1 Sandy Bridge processor line-up exposed

 

There's no doubt about it, by the end of the year Intel will start manufacturing 32nm processors based on the Sandy Bridge architecture and, just as 2011 roll in, will unleash them upon the desktop and portable PC markets to keep the money pouring in and AMD well behind on second place.

 

Unsurprisingly, although it has confirmed the release schedule of the first Sandy Bridge chips, Intel isn't saying anything (officially) about the specs of the upcoming models but thankfully, a leak is providing a good picture of what's coming.

 

The Sandy Bridge desktop and mobile offering for Q1 is detailed in the table below and it contains no less than 19 CPUs - 12 quad-cores and 7 dual-cores, going from 2.3 GHz to 3.4 GHz. The chips listed come in LGA 1155 packaging and feature an integrated (dual channel) DDR3 memory controller as well as a graphics core.

 

The mobile models all include Hyper-Threading technology but this will apparently be absent on certain desktop chips (the Core i5-2500s and i5-2400). To keep things complicated Intel will have several flavors of the same model available, these being set apart with an end letter (or lack of a letter). For example K means an unlocked multiplier, S - lower frequencies and a lower TDP, while T - even lower clocks and TDP ratings. Pricing info hasn't been revealed as it's probably still in the works.

 

intelsandybridgeq120110.jpg

 

http://www.tcmagazine.com/tcm/news/hardwar...or-line-exposed

Edited by Malevolence
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Intel almost halves prices for Core i7-950

 

Monica Chen, Taipei; Joseph Tsai, DIGITIMES [Tuesday 31 August 2010]

 

Intel recently dropped the price of its quad-core Core i7-950 processors to US$294 from US$562 to defend from AMD's recent price cuts for its quad-core Athlon II X4 640 CPU from US$122 to US$99, according to sources from motherboard makers.

 

In addition to the price cut, Intel also recently released Core i3-560, Pentium E6800 and Celeron E3500 processors with prices at US$138, US$86 and US$53, respectively, the sources noted. All the prices are in thousand-unit tray quantities.

 

For its next-generation products, Intel is set to launch Sandy Bridge processors in the first quarter of 2011, using the new LGA 1155 socket. The new processors will be required to pair with Intel's P67 chipset-based motherboards, which are scheduled to launch in October 2010.

 

http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20100831PD202.html

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