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PurpleGaga27

The end of privacy as we never know it before

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9/11/01 changed the world forever, and now privacy/piracy have changed too for over a decade. No matter what phone call you make or what you do in the Internet in the US, it will always be monitored by Uncle Sam and the telephone/cable company(s). (Uncle Sam = US govt) Pretty soon, this act could apply worldwide as well.

 

Source:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/06/obama-administration-nsa-verizon-records

and

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/06/nsa-phone-records-verizon-court-order

and

http://guardianlv.com/2013/06/patriot-act-and-the-end-of-privacy/

 

This happens yesterday when the Guardian newspaper for the UK first leaked the story. Although this may or may not be political related, the outcome results in having most American people furious about it.

 

Oh, the humanity. Here comes the doom and gloom.

 

What do you guys think?

 

 

Edit: No wonder why future PC/console games want the Internet so badly so Uncle Sam can track what are you doing. Down with the DRM.....

Edited by zocom7

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Uncle Sam just wants to preserve the 'Murican dream ^_^ :

Meanwhile+in+Murica+_062f93860376eea9654

Heheheh, goverments tend to do stuff like that, nothing new - especially for the US (the country of both internal and external fear).

So, in short - meh. If you even thought you had online/tech privacy at any moment, well... welcome the the real world.

 

Note: No offense intended.

Edited by AZ-Stalker
  • Upvote 1

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Eh, the United States is paranoid which is probably justified. Its the price you pay for being top dog. :)

 

I'd be naive to think they don't pull the same kinda crap down here, but I also know we don't have the kind of budget to justify something like a surveillance state. Sometimes its nice being small.

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It gets worse, one person did it and changed the world again. This sort of action is similar to what and how the Wiki-leaks founder did:

 

 

U.S. charges Edward Snowden with espionage in leaks about NSA surveillance programs

 

Federal prosecutors have filed a sealed criminal complaint against Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked a trove of documents about top-secret surveillance programs, and the United States has asked Hong Kong to detain him on a provisional arrest warrant, according to U.S. officials.
Snowden was charged with espionage, theft and conversion of government property, said the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak about the case.
The complaint was filed in the Eastern District of Virginia, a jurisdiction where Snowden’s former employer, Booz Allen Hamilton, is headquartered and a district with a long track record of prosecuting cases with national security implications.
A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment.
Snowden flew to Hong Kong last month after leaving his job at an NSA facility in Hawaii with a collection of highly classified documents that he acquired while working at the agency as a systems analyst.
The documents, some of which have been published in The Washington Post and Britain’s Guardian newspaper, detailed some of the most-secret surveillance operations undertaken by the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as classified legal memos and court orders underpinning the programs in the United States.
The 29-year-old intelligence analystrevealed himself June 9 as the leaker in an interview with the Guardian and said he went to Hong Kong because it provided him the “cultural and legal framework to allow me to work without being immediately detained.”
Snowden subsequently disappeared from public view; it is thought that he is still in the Chinese territory. Hong Kong has its own legislative and legal systems but ultimately answers to Beijing, under the “one country, two systems” arrangement.
The leaks have sparked national and international debates about the secret powers of the NSA to infringe on the privacy of Americans and foreigners. Officials from President Obama down have said they welcome the opportunity to explain the importance of the programs and the safeguards they say are built into them. Skeptics, including some in Congress, have said the NSA has assumed the power to soak up data about Americans that was never intended under the law.
There was never any doubt that the Justice Department would seek to prosecute Snowden for one of the most significant national security leaks in the country’s history. The Obama administration has shown a particular propensity to go after leakers and has launched more investigations that any previous administration. This White House is responsible for bringing six of the nine total indictments ever brought under the 1917 Espionage Act. Snowden will be the seventh individual when he is formally indicted.
Justice Department officials had already said that a criminal investigation of Snowden was underway and was being run out of the FBI’s Washington field office in conjunction with lawyers from the department’s National Security Division.

By filing a criminal complaint, prosecutors have a legal basis to make the request of the authorities in Hong Kong. Prosecutors now have 60 days to file an indictment, probably also under seal, and can then move to have Snowden extradited from Hong Kong for trial in the United States.
Snowden, however, can fight the extradition effort in the courts in Hong Kong. Any battle is likely to reach Hong Kong’s highest court and could last many months, lawyers in the United States and Hong Kong said.
The United States has an extradition treaty with Hong Kong, and U.S. officials said cooperation with the Chinese territory, which enjoys some autonomy from Beijing, has been good in previous cases.
The treaty, however, has an exception for political offenses, and espionage has traditionally been treated as a political offense. Snowden’s defense team in Hong Kong is likely to invoke part of the extradition treaty with the United States, which states that suspects will not be turned over to face criminal trial for offenses of a “political character.”
Snowden could also remain in Hong Kong if the Chinese government decides that it is not in the defense or foreign policy interests of the government in Beijing to have him sent back to the United States for trial.
Snowden could also apply for asylum in Hong Kong or attempt to reach another jurisdiction and seek asylum there before the authorities in Hong Kong act.
The anti-secrecy group Wikileaks has held some discussions with officials in Iceland about providing asylum to Snowden. A businessman in Iceland has offered to fly Snowden on a chartered jet to his country if he is granted asylum there.
The chief executive of Hong Kong, Leung Chun-ying, said last week that the city’s government would follow existing law if and when the U.S. government requested help.
“When the relevant mechanism is activated, the Hong Kong [special Administrative Region] Government will handle the case of Mr. Snowden in accordance with the laws and established procedures of Hong Kong,” Leung said in a statement.

 

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/us-charges-snowden-with-espionage/2013/06/21/507497d8-dab1-11e2-a016-92547bf094cc_story.html

 

Oh me, oh my. :o

Edited by zocom7

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People wanted change, so they voted Obama in, and he has certainly changed things. :P

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The NSA misled everyone? yadontsay.jpg

 

Seriously, if people actually believe that the NSA is monitoring all US citizens, you're ****ing loony.

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Maybe they aren't actively monitoring every citizen, but they certainly have the capacity to target any person or organization globally. Still concerning.

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Random Tree appearance, cool. Regardless, that's true but so does just about every other major homeland security organization in other first world nations, and even in some second and third world nations. Denying that fact would be sheer lunacy so this **** isn't anything new. That's not to say it's right and I am in full agreement that it needs to ****ing stop, but it's really old hat.

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